Barn to Badge: Branan and Chatham County Sheriff Discuss Loose Livestock and Trespassing

— Written By
en Español

El inglés es el idioma de control de esta página. En la medida en que haya algún conflicto entre la traducción al inglés y la traducción, el inglés prevalece.

Al hacer clic en el enlace de traducción se activa un servicio de traducción gratuito para convertir la página al español. Al igual que con cualquier traducción por Internet, la conversión no es sensible al contexto y puede que no traduzca el texto en su significado original. NC State Extension no garantiza la exactitud del texto traducido. Por favor, tenga en cuenta que algunas aplicaciones y/o servicios pueden no funcionar como se espera cuando se traducen.

English is the controlling language of this page. To the extent there is any conflict between the English text and the translation, English controls.

Clicking on the translation link activates a free translation service to convert the page to Spanish. As with any Internet translation, the conversion is not context-sensitive and may not translate the text to its original meaning. NC State Extension does not guarantee the accuracy of the translated text. Please note that some applications and/or services may not function as expected when translated.

Collapse ▲

Andrew Branan, Extension Assistant Professor, worked with the N.C. Cooperative Extension of Chatham County and the Chatham County Sheriff’s Office to deliver a program this past December on escaped livestock response and liability. The innovative and interactive program – called Barn to Badge – was organized by Ashley Robbins, Chatham Livestock Agent, in response to frequent questions on the topic from livestock and poultry owners.

Chatham County Sheriff Mike Roberson was on hand with a number of his deputies to interact with livestock owners and respond to questions and how the sheriff’s office responds to escaped livestock reports. Sheriff Roberson also discussed various responses to reports of trespassing, and helpful tips for landowners to minimize such incidents, such as reporting extended absences to the sheriff’s office (who will do a check-in on residences), and not hesitating to report suspicious activity. Branan discussed the basic laws of fencing and civil liability theories for injuries caused by loose livestock and poultry, as well as best practices to prevent such events from happening. (Branan’s presentation)  Branan added to the discussion on trespass liability and prevention, and gave an update on North Carolina’s recent farm nuisance lawsuits and legislative effort to insulate farmers from such claims.

Sheriff Roberson did note the need for additional training for law enforcement in livestock matters. “Our present training ensures a quick response, but we always have more to learn on getting the animals back inside the fence!”

Written By

Robert Branan, N.C. Cooperative ExtensionRobert BrananExtension Assistant Professor (Agricultural and Environmental Law) Call Robert Email Robert Agricultural & Resource Economics
NC State Extension, NC State University
Updated on May 28, 2020
Was the information on this page helpful? Yes check No close
Scannable QR Code to Access Electronic Version